D. B. COX

PASSING FOR BLUE
---For D.N.K.


"The blues is a black man's music, and whites diminish
it at best or steal it at worst"
- Ralph J. Gleason - Jazz Critic

My best friend

died last year,

in a 24-hour store --

shot by some shaky kid


when he walked

in on a 32 dollar holdup

to buy a pack

of Marlboros.


He was a blues-man.


He knew more

about Robert Johnson

and Tampa Red

than Amiri Baraka -- or Leroi Jones.


He used up most of his time,

and all of his options

preaching to the blue

multitudes, jammed


into the cheap neon

playgrounds, along

the whore-haunted streets

of late-night Memphis;


where no accusing eyes

ever questioned the

heartfelt disguise, he wore

like an invisible man.


And on the day

his ashes were

tossed toward

the rain-polished sky,


there were no

sad fans weeping,

no sanctifying poetry

from Langston Hughes,


just a southbound

breeze to ride on,

for the white boy --

passing for blue.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

WHERE DO THEY ALL COME FROM

"Then this morning I went to the bookstore and bought The Catcher in the Rye.
I'm sure the large part of me is Holden Caulfield, who is the main person in the book.
The small part of me must be the Devil."
- Mark David Chapman

He lies, face-up, on the floor

of a hotel room he can't afford.

His eyes are closed. On his chest,

a closed paperback moves slowly up & down - marking time.


The plan is clear.

Everything he wants to say,

reduced to a

single blinding point.


A warning message to false prophets.

A Technicolor caution sign

to purveyors of empty noise,

& meaningless bullshit.


A .38 special delivery

from a real nowhere man,

to the used-up hero

who haunts Dakota halls,


& hides behind elegant walls,

that cannot save him.

Lost to himself, hopelessly slipping

into some half-assed parody.


He opens his eyes & checks his watch.

Almost time to rock & roll,

lock & load,

cross the street, & disappear


into the faceless

New York hum -


"All the lonely people,

where do they all come from?"


Copyright 2004 D.B. COX. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


D.B.Cox:
Blues musician/poet, originally from South Carolina, currently resides
in Watertown Massachusetts. Uses a Les Paul Standard, tuned to Open
E chord for slide guitar, and prefers a glass slide to a metal one. No longer
takes requests when he plays out.






2003 Underground Voices